Wednesday, November 21, 2012

The Dome of the Rock is based on Vedic Stupa Design

The conflict in the Middle East is driven largely by a Muslim shrine called the "Dome of the Rock" built in 691 AD on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. This is because the Hebrew Temple of Jerusalem was once built on this very site and many people now want to tear down the Dome and rebuild the "Third Temple of Solomon" here.

The primary dispute concerns the Dome's Foundation Stone and what lies bene
ath it. Known as the Pierced Stone, it is a large rock with a small hole on the southeastern corner that reveals a cavern beneath the rock. This cavern is known as the Well of Souls and is believed by Jews to be the location of the Holy of Holies of Solomon's original temple. It is considered the Navel of the World.

The reason rebuilding the Hebrew Temple is so important to so many is due to Hebrew prophecy that says it must be rebuilt prior to the End of Days when the Messianic Age will usher in peace and unity for all mankind. Muslims also believe this is the location where Muhammad ascended to heaven.

The rebuilding of the Third Temple plays a major role in some interpretations of Christian eschatology, especially Mormon Christianity. It is widely believed that the Second Coming of Christ will not happen without this temple being rebuilt. For this reason, many powerful people seek a solution in the MIddle East that centers on overcoming Islamic control of the Temple Mount and reestablishing the Jewish Temple.

There are those who suggest the Freemason brotherhood would also like to rebuild the Third Temple. This claim is based on the high importance of Solomon's Temple to Masonic symbolism and ritual. Thus, it would seem that many Christians, Jews, Mormons and probably a lot of Freemasons would like to see the Third Temple rebuilt over the Foundation Stone and Well of Souls.

Of course, for this to happen an all-out war in the Middle East would be required, likely as a prelude to world war. Viewed from this perspective, it is easier to make sense of the underlying motivations behind U.S. and NATO policies toward Islamic nations in the Middle East. It is not just about oil.

So, given the relevance of the Temple Mount to world peace, we might now wonder what is so holy about the Rock and Well of Souls that lies beneath? Why is it worth triggering a world war?

According to the Hebrew Talmud, it was from this rock that the world was created. It was close to here that Jews believe God gathered the earth together and formed it into Adam. It is the rock that comprises the sacred Mount Moriah and the rock upon which Jacob dreamt of angels ascending and descending on a ladder, later consecrating it with oil and offering a sacrifice.

Now, those who have read my previous posts will recall that the story of Jacobs Ladder was probably a retelling of the Vedic ascension ceremony (climbing Mt. Meru) which would have centered on ingestion of an entheogenic communion known as Soma (see links in comments). The Rock of the Temple Mount was thus believed to be the source of these visions and a residing place of God. Such rock worship was not uncommon in ancient times, found as a central theme in later Mithraism and Roman Catholicism.

Given this, we might now wonder if the Well of Souls cave beneath the Rock might also be an ancient chamber (the original Holy of Holies) where Hebrew priests once chanted and took Holy Communion to induce religious visions. After all, the curved ceiling of the cave is said to feature a psychoacoustical "voices of the dead" resonance effect similar to hearing the sea from seashells.

Alas, it seems world peace now hangs in the balance around a sacred rock and a resonant cave on a little hill where holy men induced visions to commune with their ancestors. As the holiest chamber of Abraham and Navel of the World, it is no small irony that it became the epicenter of conflict between hundreds of millions of Jews, Christians and Muslims. And to think it's just about who gets to use the most awesome trip room in the world.

The Venus Blueprint: 
Uncovering 
the Ancient Science
of Sacred Spaces
 

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